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Why are old glass coffee or tea cups so small

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Today's standard cup size is larger than a hundred years ago. The modern coffee machine changed how people drink coffee and tea. This blog post will explain why old glass coffee and tea cups are so small, by talking about how Americans drank their coffee and tea over time.

Old Glass Coffee and Tea Cups are Small

Old glass coffee and tea cups were small because they were handblown, and that's just how it was done. The cups weren't more than a few ounces because people drank their coffee or tea quickly. In the early 1800s, as time went on, cups got larger but still didn't exceed four ounces.

Old glass cups were small because people drank their coffee and tea quickly. The cups were also small, because they were handblown.

The cups were also small, because they were handblown. The process of blowing glass was a slow one at the time and it was impossible to make large pieces of glass. So what we have left are small cups that people drank quickly from because they didn't have time for leisurely sipping in an age before electricity.

Today's standard cup size is larger than a hundred years ago.

The standard cup was originally used at the end of the 19th century and was made of glass. It was tiny, but not just because it was made out of glass—the cups were small because they were meant to be consumed quickly and on the go.

Today, however, there are no more handblown cups; instead we enjoy our drinks in larger vessels that can hold more liquid so we don't have to refill them as often (and thus spend less time waiting for our coffee or tea). In addition to this being more practical, it also means that companies can sell more product per unit of time by making their packaging bigger.

The modern coffee machine changed how people drink coffee and tea.

In this article, we'll explore the changes that have occurred to our drinking habits over time, as well as their effect on the size of our cups.

Let's consider efficiency. To increase efficiency and make a better product for your customers (and yourself), it makes sense to cut down any steps you can in making a drink—like having an extra step where you need to transfer from one cup to another. This is less efficient because it adds more time and effort for your customer's beverage preparation experience, which means that they'll be waiting longer for their drinks when they come up at the counter or waiting longer after ordering if you're brewing by hand instead of using an automated system like Keurig or Instant Pot (which both use single-serve pods).

Old glass cups were small because people drank their coffee and tea quickly. The cups were also small, because they were handblown

Because they were handblown, the cups were naturally small.

When you drink coffee and tea quickly, you don't want to use a giant glass mug. It is more comfortable to hold a smaller cup with your hands wrapped around it. The same goes for a cup of hot chocolate in winter: you want something small and warm in your hands that will keep them from getting cold while also not weighing down your arms too much.

Old-fashioned glassware is made from thicker glass than modern ceramics or plastics because it takes longer to cool down after being heated up by the person making it—and this makes the walls thicker so that the material does not fracture when dropped or hit against other objects (as often happened during cooking).

We love the vintage look of old glass cups, and we're excited to share them with you! If you're looking for more information on how we can help preserve these beautiful pieces of history, please visit our website or contact us today

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